• On-Line Zakat Payment Facilities

    This service provides a convenient way of fullfilling one of the pillars of Islam. Over the past years we have noticed that more and more members are using our service. Because of the importance of zakat, this service is open to all Muslims regardless of whether they are Melayu UK members or not.

  • Hari Raya Party

    Eid ul-Fitr (a celebration to mark the end of the fasting month, Ramadan) and Eid ul-Adha are joyous times for Muslims. Melayu UK organises Eid parties on these occasions..

  • Perhimpunan Keluarga

    We organise Perhimpunan Keluarga to enable members and their family to get together for a few days for socialising. Perhimpunan Keluarga is also packed with various activities such as archery, orienteering, tog-o-war, pioneering and BBQ. Children who have been to Perhimpunan Keluarga still have vivid memories of the enjoyment that they experienced during their childhood years.

  • Learn to read the Quran

    Our members are scattered across the UK and many live is areas where there are few Muslims and getting the opportunities to learn about Islam is limited. Those who would like to learn how to read the Quran can now subscribe to an online self-learning system at http://mytajwid.pisang.uk

  • Counselling Services

    Counselling services can be obtained from PISANG (Professional Islamic Support and Nurture Group), a Malay-driven not-for-profit organisation. Please visit their website www.pisang.uk for more information.

Melayu UK

Leading by example

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Melayu UK does not charge any membership fee and is dependent on sponsorship for our activities. Please become our sponsors.

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Monday, 22 July 2019 07:41

Young People's Comic Competition

Melayu UK is proud to organise a Young People's Comic Competition. Details of the competition are as follows:

 

  1. Participation eligibility: The competition is open only to those of Malay heritage and who are residents in the UK i.e. those with indefinite leave to remain in the UK and UK citizens.
  2. The theme of the comic is Gotong Royong. 
  3. Drawing can be by hand or produced digitally.
  4. The comic must cover two sides of A4 paper or one side of A3 paper
  5. Designs must be submitted before Thursday 25th August 2019
  6. Please email designs in PDF format to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
  7. Decisions of the judges are final 

 

Prizes will be awarded at Melayu UK Eid-ul-Adha celebration where all entries will be on display. Prizes for 2 categories will be awarded for each age group as follows;

 

Category: Concept
Age group: Young Adults
Prize: £100
 

Category: Design and presentation
Age group: Young Adults
Prize: £100
 

Category: Concept
Age group: Secondary
Prize: £75
 

Category: Design and presentation
Age group: Secondary
Prize: £75
 

Category: Concept
Age group: Juniors
Prize: £50
 

Category: Design and presentation
Age group: Juniors
Prize: £50
 

Category: Concept
Age group: Infants
Prize: £30
 

Category: Design and presentation
Age group: Infants
Prize: £30

 

Sunday, 21 July 2019 21:47

Eidul Adha Hari Raya Party

Assalamu alaikum,

 

InshaAllah we will have our Jamuan Hari Raya Eidul Adha in Bicester on Sunday 1st September 2019 from 12pm to 6pm. We are also extending the Young People's Comic Competition submission deadline to one week before the Eidul Adha party. The new end date for submission of entry is Sunday 25th August 2019. Prizes will be given during the Eidul Adha event. Please share this information to others.

 

Please support Melayu UK financially by making monthly donation of £1. Donation can be paid into our general account:

Bank: Lloyds Bank 
Sort code: 30-96-96 
Account Number: 50430368 
Account Name: Melayu UK

Friday, 19 July 2019 21:43

Eidul adha: The hijrah of Siti Sarah

Assalamu alaikum,

 

Eidul adha is just under a month away. Most likely we will know someone who is going to perform his or her hajj this year. It is a journey to perform one of our obligations if we can afford it. The technological advances in transportation nowadays enables one to reach Makkah in a matter of hours. Our grandparents who relied on sea travel took weeks to get there. How long do we think Prophet Ibrahim a.s. took to get there from Sham and back? He made a few journeys, first to send his wife Siti Hajar and son Ismail a.s., another when Ismail was married to his first wife and another when Ismail a.s. was married to his second wife after divorcing his ungrateful first wife.

 

The journey of Siti Hajar has some similarity with some of us. She went there with a “one-way ticket”, knowing that she went to Makkah to live there indefinitely. There are obviously many differences to the journey that some of us made. She had to live in a barren dessert, a very harsh environment with no support from any other human. Her asset was just the well of zamzam, a gift from Allah with unlimited supply of water. We in the UK are lucky with the availability of the benefit system to support us in time of financial hardship. She was totally cut-off from Sham where she used to live. We have the choice to follow or get obsessed with social or political developments in Malaysia. Her hijrah was an absolute hijrah with her body and soul focussed on the new homeland. Those of us who made the hijrah from Malaysia to the UK can choose to have our body in the UK but our souls and thoughts attached to Malaysia. There is nothing wrong with this but we need to realise that our younger members who are born and bred in the UK do not share this sort of mind-body split. If we focus too much or get obsessed with political developments in Malaysia, we will lose focus on developing our community in the UK. We chose to become irrelevant to our younger generation.

 

Hijrah requires a change in our mindset and acknowledge that there is a change of priority. When our Prophet s.a.w. migrated from Makkah to Madinah, he started building the necessary social and political infrastructure by strengthening the fabric of society. The muhajirin who came from Makkah worked together in harmony with the ansars from Madinah. The concept of creating ghettos for the muhajirin to live in Madinah was never in anybody’s mind. Migrants and hosts did their best to find similarities and became partners in nation building. This contributed to the success of the cosmopolitan city of Madinah. We need to frequently assess ourselves. If we are the muhajirin from the Malay world, how much have we contributed to our new homeland?

Friday, 28 June 2019 21:49

Making the unpredictable predictable

Assalamu alaikum,

 

The British weather. What do we know about the British weather? Unpredictable! You plan for a BBQ a week in advance and it rains on the day. When you think that summer has arrived, it turned cold the next week. Just over a week ago flooding makes headlines and this weekend the extremely hot weather is sure to make headlines. We don’t like unpredictability but yet have to live with it. However not everything is unpredictable. Certain unpredictability can be turned to high level of predictability. Community relationship is an example. If nothing is done to strengthen community relationship, the best we can get is unknown and we have to brace for the unpredictable events. If proper planning to strengthen community relationship is in force, then the unpredictability will diminish.

 

Apply that to our community, the Malays in the UK. The Malays have settled here for decades but a proper programme for community bonding was absent. Yes, there were houses in London and Liverpool that were used as meeting places for the Malays. However, they were not truly meeting places for the community but served as meeting places for a single generation. When the generation goes, the building becomes dysfunctional and turns into a nostalgic item. A building without a proper community programme will not be able to do anything. It is the programme, not the building, which is vital. We have lost contact with almost all, if not all, of the descendants of the Malays who came in the 1950s or prior to that. We can say that is predictable because nothing was done. However in life we always want predictability that brings good news and happiness, not predictability that brings sadness and grieve. Do we have an answer if we want to predict how the Malay community will be three decades from now? “Hope for the best” is probably the comforting answer. Comforting because that is better than unpredictability. Comforting because we bet on hope in the absence of effort. At the moment we still do not have a proper, systematic and sustainable programme for our community. Parents can try to look after their own children but there is a time limit and we all know it.

 

We have to admit that Melayu UK is still very disorganised and lack the commitment of members. To recognise our weaknesses is a good thing. This will encourage us do something about it. Without any commitment, nothing can be done effective and sustainability will be extremely difficult, if not impossible. We can never expect everybody to be committed as that is definitely impossible. Most people will be followers and will follow whatever trend is popular. This is the picture that our Prophet (peace be upon him) had visualised of what will happen to his ummah, who will be many but weak. He described them as scum that moves according to the direction of the waves. Sukarno, realised that he needed a team to create the waves and said “Give me ten youths and I will shake the world”. That is a good reason for Melayu UK to need ten people that can shake this part of the world. Anyone there?

Wednesday, 19 June 2019 21:51

Balik or Pergi?

Assalamu alaikum,

 

Melayu UK is a community comprising of people of Malay heritage who lives in the UK. Living in UK means that we accept UK as our home. First generation Malays in the UK who were born in Malaysia may unconsciously find it difficult to fully accept that the UK is their new home. So the term “balik Malaysia” is frequently used when one makes a trip to Malaysia. “Balik” implies “going back home”. This phenomenon is not unique to the Malays in the UK. Other ethnic minorities in the UK e.g. the British Pakistanis uses the phrase “back home” to refer to Pakistan.

 

Second or third generation UK Malays who were born and bred in the UK will most likely accept that UK is the one and only home. For them “pergi” is the correct term to use compared to “balik” when making a trip to Malaysia. Our community comprises of many who were born in Malaysia and an even bigger number of those who were born and bred in the UK. In one household, we can have part of the family members who still consciously or unconsciously refer to Malaysia as the “home” and the rest of the family consciously and unconsciously consider UK as the one and only home.

 

It is not wrong to have an attachment with the Malay world e.g. Malaysia, Indonesia etc. In fact this is encouraged as the Malays have a rich cultural heritage that can enrich our community. First generation Malays in the UK are key to creating the cultural bridge between UK-born Malays and the Malay world. The bridge can be created on a smaller scale that involves only family members e.g. making regular family trips to Malaysia. However not everybody has the time or the financial resource to make this happen. As a community, we have to think of more cost-effective methods that can benefit a larger section of our community. This may involve organising events or activities that combines the interests of UK-born members with a blend of Malay culture. For example outdoor activities such as camping and hiking are common activities that attract UK-born members and we have to look at these as opportunities for bonding and blending the Malay culture. It is not currently practical for Melayu UK to organise them regularly at national level. However members can organise such activities on a smaller scale at local level and advertise them on Melayu UK FaceBook. The physical interaction between members is needed for us to create a loving caring community. This is in line with the theme of our recent Perhimpunan Keluarga i.e. “Melayu UK: Moving offline”.

Tuesday, 18 June 2019 21:53

Thanks for the donations

Assalamu alaikum,

 

I would like to thank those who have set up monthly direct debit as donation/sadaqah to Melayu UK. May Allah give them abundant reward for their generosity and commitment in sharing the task of making Melayu UK dominant in the building and welfare of our community. As I have mentioned in earlier posts, our prime target are the younger generation. We have to show that we care for them. Simple and sometime cheap token of appreciation can bring big meanings to them. We can see how happy children are when they get stickers for their achievement in school. It is not the value of the stickers that make them happy. We can buy hundreds of stickers and give them to the children but those stickers will mean nothing to them compared to the single sticker they got from their teacher as an acknowledgement for their achievement.

 

As a community, we can do similar things i.e. acknowledging the potential and achievement of our young generation. This can be achieved easily if we do it collectively. Our community is many times bigger than the number of people who have joined our FaceBook. There are many who are not on our facebook but are active members. We can all afford to donate £1 per month to Melayu UK. The amount of £1 per month is statistically insignificant compared to the amount that we earn. We don’t moan or get depressed if we lose £1 per month. We just need to convince ourselves that this is for a good cause and we can afford to spend a few minutes to set up the direct debit. Our bank account is as follows:

 

Bank: Lloyds Bank

Sort code: 30-96-96

Account Number: 50430368

Account Name: Melayu UK

 

Hamidi

(President)

Tuesday, 11 June 2019 21:55

Successful Oxford Eid Extravaganza

Assalamu alaikum,

 

Alhamdulillah the Oxford Eid Extravaganza on Sunday went very well. An estimated 6000 to 7000 people came compared to last years’ 5000. The weather was perfect with plenty of sunshine and the right temperature. The day before the event was raining and very windy and we could not set up any gazebos in advance. The day after the event was very cold and raining heavily. We have to take the good weather as a rahmah from Allah for our noble and sincere intention. During a period of stormy weather that make news headlines across Europe, Allah has given us a day of perfect weather.

Organising such a big event which involves diverse communities is not easy and need a lot of commitment, perseverance and planning. The key person who organised the event was Mujahid Hamidi (Mujahid Hijama), an active member of Melayu UK. Congratulations to him and may Allah help him to organise more and better events in the future. I would like to thank everyone that helped in organising the event as well as helping in the preparation and sale of food during the event and also in the cleaning up after the event. Pisang House in Bicester, where preparations of food took place, was busy throughout the day and night and many of us had very minimal sleep. The dedication shown by all volunteers is amazing and can only come from their sincerity in helping. May Allah reward all those volunteers and bless them with multiple rewards, give then abundant rizq, reward them with good health, answer their prayers and protect them from the evils of jinn, shaytan and mankind. Amin.

Friday, 07 June 2019 21:56

Sustainability of our ibadah

Assalamu alaikum,

 

Alhamdulillah we had the opportunity to increase our ibadah during the month of Ramadan. It was a month when were able to do more ibadah for our spiritual upliftment. It was a month than we witnessed our own generosity and friendliness. We were able to suppress our desires to reveal our better personalities. We wish that we can carry on with all these and permanently become an even better person. However we may find this very challenging. As the last Ramadan leaves us, we may find that the spiritual upliftment that we gained may gradually disappear and we wait for the Ramadan next year to build it up again. If all the gains that we achieved in Ramadan were lost before the next Ramadan and we need another Ramadan to get back what we have lost, truly this is an indication that we are in a viscous circle. We can only be a better person for less than a year but not a better person as we grow older.

 

We allocated more time in Ramadan for our spiritual upliftment but the challenge is how to keep the momentum so that we truly benefit on a long term. Every person is different and it is important for us to individually assess ourselves. With the assessment, we will be able to embark on a sustainable programme that we started in Ramadan. Sustainable is the key as this will enable us to carry on without feeling the burden. For example if we only complete reading the Quran every Ramadan but doesn’t read the Quran in the other months, we can start a daily programme for the recitation of Quran. We can, for example, read two pages a day and this will enable us to complete the Quran before the next Ramadan. The Quran has only 604 pages and it only takes 302 days, which is about 10 months, to complete it. If we read four pages a day, then we will be able to complete the Quran twice before the next Ramadan. Setting a sustainable minimum will enable us to achieve our target. If we read more on any of our “good days”, then this is a bonus for us. If we miss one or two days, we may be able to catch up later in the week. We can only feel good because the minimum target can be achieved.

 

Similar sustainable projects can be implemented as part of our programme for consistent spiritual upliftment. We may be generous in Ramadan and make sadaqah worth tens or hundreds of pounds but may find it difficult to keep that level of generosity for the other months. We can continue to be generous by starting a sustainable sadaqah programme. For example, we can give sadaqah of £1 per per month to Melayu UK. This is sustainable and if we find that we have spare money on some of the other months and give more, then we can treat this as a bonus for our generosity.

 

Setting anything beyond what we can sustain may not have a long term effect. If conditions changed and we are not able to continue with our commitment, we will feel bad and this may lead us to abandon what we started. Always set a sustainable minimum target. We should not feel embarrassed for doing something which is small or tiny. The main thing is that we can do it consistently without fail. Our prophet (peace be upon him) said “Take up good deeds only as much as you are able, for the best deeds are those done regularly even if they are few.” Sustainability is the key to deeds that can be done regularly.

Wednesday, 29 May 2019 22:01

Nurturing from birth

Asssalamu alaikum,

 

Laylatul qadr is a night that would be nice to know in advance so that we can maximise our ibadah to take advantage of the benefit of the night. However that is not going to happen and we have to maximise our ibadah every night without taking any chance. Doing ibadah on that single night is equivalent one thousand months or about 80 years, which is roughly equivalent to our lifetime if we live that long. It doesn’t mean that we can relax after that as we have done a lifetime’s worth of worship. Imam Nawawi witnessed laylatul qadr when he was 7 years old but yet he spent his entire life dedicated to gaining and disseminating knowledge for the sake of Allah. He died at a very young age of about 44 years old but he wrote a large number of books that one wonders how he managed to write all those books. He also had large amount of knowledge and he had to limit what he wrote so that the books do not become excessively thick. We are familiar with his Forty Hadith and Riyadhus Salihin and these are actually a compressed version of the knowledge of Islam. The Forty Hadith is a thin book but the knowledge behind each hadith can be decompressed to reveal a wider knowledge of Islam that we will not have the time to learn all of them.

 

Imam Nawawi is one of those who were selected by Allah to witness laylatul qadr. He lived a simple life full of humbleness and yet contributed so much to the Muslim world in his short life. He left behind abundant knowledge which are his amal jariah (continuous deeds). His achievement should be an inspiration to us who have or most likely with exceed the 44 years of living. We need to reflect and improve not just our relationship with Allah but also our relationship with mankind. Our relationship and contribution to mankind is also important. Imam Nawawi contributed a lot to society and we will not be able to achieve anywhere near to what he had achieved. However there are still a lot of things that we can and need to do to better ourselves. We can assess ourselves on how much we contribute to society. This can be achieved by evaluating how much people will miss us in our absence. If people forget about us after our death, it shows that our contribution to society is insignificant if not nil.

 

It is important for us to realise that the journey in our life is not just about our individualistic self but also about our contribution to the community. Our success will be short-lived if success is confined to us personally. Everything will be gone once we are dead. However if others can benefit from our success, then that success brings meaning and will last a very very long time. Imam Nawawi with his sincerity and humbleness had successfully accumulated a lot of knowledge and the whole Muslim ummah are benefitting from his success. He was a person whom Allah had taken care from birth to death and was also a gift to the Muslims.

 

Nurturing someone from birth can prevent scandals or controversies that plague the person in his or her later life. We can all dream of children whom we can nurture from birth so that they become successful and are valued by the community. There is nothing wrong in having that dream but do we just want to dream? There is nothing to stop us from putting effort in making the dream a reality. We have our own small community and we have young children in our community whom we can nurture. The only question that we need to ask ourselves is whether we are willing to do it. If there is a will, there is a way.

Tuesday, 28 May 2019 22:02

Melayu UK at Oxford Eid Extravaganza

Assalamu alaikum,

 

We are within the last 10 days of Ramadan and apart from increasing our ibadah for our spiritual upliftment, we are also thinking about the eid celebration to mark the end of Ramadan. The aim of the celebration is the same but there are cultural differences in the manner of celebrating the occasion. In Malaysia, the concept of “rumah terbuka” or “open house” is common. When you have a “rumah terbuka”, everybody is welcome and strangers whom you have not met before become your invited guests. Organising it can mean setting up marquees outside the house and blocking the road to accommodate the huge number of guests. It causes disruption to traffic flow but the inconvenience is often tolerated and taken as a pleasure by the neighbours. “Rumah terbuka” is an occasion to know someone and whom you have seen before but never had the chance to say salam or hello. It is also an occasion to build relationship with your neighbours or make new friends. So it is not uncommon to have people organising “rumah terbuka” throughout the month of Shawal as there are many households that need to be visited and neighbours mutually scheduling their turn.

 

Unfortunately the practice of “open house” is not practical in the UK for various reasons. This is also not practiced by the other Muslim communities. In other words the concept of “rumah terbuka” is alien to the Muslim community in the UK. Without a big garden, the space inside the house makes it difficult, if not impossible, to accommodate many guests. Furthermore if eid falls in winter months, the garden is not an option. So we have to resort to organising eid events in public places that can accommodate more people. Melayu UK in the past have organised many eid parties and have attracted a lot of members who were willing to travel long distances to meet up with other members. The prime motivation for attending our eid parties was not food, as better options for food can be obtained at other nearby events or by simply going to good restaurants.

 

Melayu UK will not be holding any Eid-ul Fitri party this year. Instead, we will be joining the Oxford Eid Extravaganza where we will have a food stall with the aim raising fund for Melayu UK. We will be sharing the stall with the organisers of the event which is a bonus to us. This a huge public event that will be attended by thousands of Muslims and non-Muslims. It is a great event for integration and mutual understanding between different communities. We hope Melayu UK members will attend this event for us to bond our relationship. We are also still looking for volunteers who can help in the preparation on Saturday 8th June and the sale of food on Sunday 9th June 2019. There are still many things that need to be done and finalised. We also welcome ideas and other forms of contributions. Those who are willing to help can contact any committee members directly.

Please visit Oxford Eid Extravaganza Facebook athttps://www.facebook.com/OxfordEidExtravaganza

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